Florida Florida. How Soon We Forget.

People Demanding Action Radio Network

Banner

 

FL-TalahasseeVoters

Last spring, Florida made some changes to its election law. Cloaked as technical tweaks, the new laws have the potential to swing the 2012 election.

When it comes to presidential elections, Florida matters. With 29 electoral votes, Florida is by far the most influential swing state in the country. Who gets to vote in Florida could determine who will win the election.

There are over 11 million registered voters in the state. But after the changes put in place last spring, there may be far fewer Floridians going to the polls in 2012. President Obama and the Republican nominee will be fighting for every last one of those votes. The state is so critical to the race that there’s early talk of Floridian political stars like Senator Marco Rubio or former Governor Jeb Bush joining the Republican ticket. In 2008, Obama defeated Senator John McCain in Florida by a little more than 200,000 votes, out of more than 8 million cast.

The changes enacted last spring include severe restrictions on groups that register new voters, cutting the early voting period nearly in half and rolling back voting rights for those with criminal convictions in their past.

Of course this year will not be the first time Floridians have had trouble casting a ballot. Most of us remember the perfect storm of Florida election administration that kept the 2000 presidential election hanging on 537 votes for over a month, only to be finally handed to George W. Bush by a 5-4 vote backing an unsigned Supreme Court opinion.

The pathetic scene in 2000 was created by a convergence of administrative errors, technical glitches and a lack of judgment at the highest levels of election administration: broken polling machines, inaccurate and incomplete voter registration lists, inadequate language translation, inaccessible polling places, poorly trained poll workers and an overall lack of preparation for a large voter turnout that created long lines, eligible voters being turned away and valid votes left uncounted.

Although voters across the state were stymied that year, poor and minority communities suffered the worst of it. In a report documenting its comprehensive investigation of the 2000 election, the United States Commission on Civil Rights found that approximately 11 percent of Florida voters in 2000 were African-American; yet African-Americans cast more than half of the 180,000 rejected ballots. The commission found that “statistical data, reinforced by credible anecdotal evidence, point to the widespread denial of voting rights.” The report then concluded that “the disenfranchisement of Florida’s voters fell most harshly on the shoulders of black voters.”

There is a long and troubled history of voter discrimination in Florida. Florida became a state in 1845, but refused to extend civil and political rights to blacks immediately following the Civil War. In its 1865 constitution, Florida explicitly limited the right to vote to “free white males.” In 1866, it rejected the 14th Amendment which granted equal citizenship to freed slaves. As a condition of readmission to the Union, Congress required Florida to extend voting rights regardless of race. In response, Florida’s 1868 Constitution established a legislative apportionment scheme that diminished representation from densely populated black counties and put in place a lifetime voting ban for people with criminal convictions that targeted crimes for which blacks were most often convicted like larceny, perjury and bribery. These measures were followed in 1885 by a poll tax, giving the legislature “the power to make the payment of the capitation tax a prerequisite for voting.”

Throughout the Jim Crow era, African-Americans who tried to register and vote in Florida were harassed and intimidated, resulting in extremely low voter registration rates. In 1961, the United States Commission on Civil Rights documented several of these incidents. In Liberty County, according to the Commission’s report:

Some Negroes registered in 1956, but thereafter they were subjected to harassment. Crosses were burned and fire bombs hurled upon their property, and abusive and threatening telephone calls were made late at night. Two white men advised one of the registrants that if the Negroes would remove their names from the books all the trouble would stop. All but one did remove their names, and their troubles ended; the one who did not was forced to leave the county.

The commission’s report presented corresponding statistics which showed that in the Florida counties with the highest black populations, the rates of black voter registration were the lowest in the state. In Gadsden County, one of two Florida counties where in 1960 blacks were the majority of the local population, there were 12,261 African-Americans of voting age, only seven of whom were registered to vote.

In 1965, Congress passed the Voting Rights Act to outlaw discriminatory voting rules and practices. Section 5 of the Act requires certain parts of the country, with particularly egregious histories of voting discrimination, to obtain approval from the federal government before making changes to their state election laws. Although Florida had a long history of voter discrimination, it was not originally covered by Section 5.

In 1975, Congress extended Section 5’s provisions and expanded its scope to address voting discrimination against members of language minority groups. After this expansion, five counties in Florida, which make up about nine percent of Florida’s total voting age population, now fall under Section 5 based on documented discrimination against language minorities. As a result, any changes to the state election code that will impact those counties must be “precleared” by either the Department of Justice or the federal district court in Washington.

So where do things stand today in Florida? Not surprisingly, it’s a bit complicated.

In March 2011, Governor Rick Scott rolled back the right to vote for hundreds of thousands – perhaps as many as a million – Florida citizens who have criminal records. Florida has long had one of the harshest felony voting bans in the country, but Governor Scott not only reversed some moderate reforms put in place by former Governor Charlie Crist, he made the state’s policy even more restrictive than it was under the previous governor, Jeb Bush.

Under the new rules, even people with nonviolent convictions must wait five years after they complete all terms of their sentences before they are allowed to apply for restoration of civil rights; the clock resets if an individual is arrested, including for a misdemeanor, during the five-year waiting period. In some cases, people must wait seven years before being able to apply, and then they must appear in person for a hearing before the clemency board in Tallahassee.  Remember: all of this has to happen just to have the opportunity to ask for one’s right to vote back. After the waiting period, the application and the hearing, you could be denied restoration with no reason or explanation. And if that happens, you have to wait another two years before starting the process all over again.

Prior to Governor Scott’s changes, nearly a quarter of those disenfranchised in Florida were African-American. The new rules will most likely increase this number. For example, Florida law enforcement statistics show that nearly 35 percent of all arrests and 41 percent of drug arrests in Florida in 2010 were of African-Americans (African-Americans make up 16 percent of the state’s population). Consequently, the new “arrest-free” waiting period is likely to increase the impact on minorities.

In May 2011, Governor Scott signed an omnibus election law that makes it more difficult to register and to vote in Florida. The new law imposes severe restrictions and penalties on nonpartisan groups that register voters and slashes the number of days allowed for early voting, including eliminating the option of voting on the Sunday before Election Day.

These may seem like little technical tweaks, but in fact their impact could be dramatic. According to the League of Women Voters, African-American and Hispanic voters register to vote through community registration drives at twice the rate of white voters. Nearly 54 percent of Florida’s African-American voters used early voting sites in 2008. On the Sunday before the election, African-Americans accounted for nearly a third of the statewide turnout.

Who Votes?

A series about the complexities of voters and voting.

The new restrictions on voter registration groups include requiring every individual who registers voters on behalf of an organization to register his name and address with the state, and requires groups to turn in completed registration forms within 48 hours, or risk fines and penalties. As a result, the League of Women Voters and Rock the Vote have shut down their voter registration efforts in the state. There has already been a significant drop-off in new voter registration. Last week, The Times reported that in the months since the new law took effect, 81,471 fewer Floridians have registered to vote than in the same period in 2008.

In January, the Okaloosa County Branch of the Florida N.A.A.C.P. registered several new voters on Sunday of Martin Luther King weekend. According to the Times, the group submitted the forms on Tuesday, Jan. 17, when the local elections office reopened. Soon after, the group was copied on an e-mail from the county supervisor of elections reporting that the forms were turned in an hour past the 48-hour deadline.

The official rationale for these changes remains vague. Legislators who supported the new law said the tighter restrictions would combat fraud, but they have yet to identify a specific problem that will be addressed by these changes. In one of the few public statements from supporters of the law, State Senator Michael Bennett provided some clarity, explaining his support for the legislation during the floor debate:

You say it is inconvenient. Ever read the stories about people in Africa? People in the desert who literally walk 200-300 miles so they could have an opportunity to do what we do? And we want to make it more convenient? How much more convenient do you want to make it? Want to go to their house? Take the polling booth with us? This is a hard fought privilege. This is something people died for. And you want to make it convenient? To the guy who died to give you that right, it was not convenient. Why would we make it any easier? I want ‘em to fight for it. I want ‘em to know what it’s like. I want ‘em to have to walk across town to go over and vote.

The lengths to which Governor Scott is willing to go to defend this new law also raise flags about whether they are merely a technical fix or something more powerful. Last June, Florida submitted these changes to the Department of Justice as required by Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. National and local voting rights groups strongly opposed the state’s submission, arguing that the new law disproportionately harmed minority voters.

A month later, before the D.O.J. could issue its ruling on the new law, Florida withdrew its submission from the D.O.J.’s review, opting instead to seek approval from the federal district court. In October, the state filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. Then in December, a number of voting rights groups challenged the law on First Amendment grounds, arguing that speaking to and registering voters is protected speech. That’s a lot of legal maneuvering, and the impact of these various lawsuits on Florida’s role in the presidential election remains unknown.

Florida should remember its past and then leave it behind. Rather than creating new and different obstructions to voting, it is time for the state to do its part to realize the true promise of our democracy.  That cannot happen until Florida repeals the barriers it put in place last year and allows the Voting Rights Act to do its job. How much longer will we have to wait until every vote counts?

Link to original article from The New York Times Opinion

Erika L. Wood is an associate professor of law at New York Law School. Christopher Binns, a student at New York Law School, contributed research to this article.


blog comments powered by Disqus

States - Florida

Florida Articles

Prev Next Page:

Florida Is Illegally Limiting How Often Poor People On Medicaid Can Visit The ER

Florida Is Illegally Limiting How Often Poor People On Medicaid Can Visit The ER

Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s (R) effort to save his state’s Medicaid program money on the backs of the poor just backfired. In 2012, the Scott administration lobbied the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to allow it to limit the number of times that Medicaid beneficiaries can frequent emergency rooms to six visits. The Obama administration rejected that request, arguing that it constitutes a violation of the Social Security Act by placing “an arbitrary limit” on a legally mandated benefit, and that it has the potential to harm poor patients,...

Sy Mukherjee | Think Progress 04 Mar 2014 Hits:513 Florida

Read more

Rep. Trey Radel of Florida to take leave of absence after guilty plea to cocaine charge

Rep. Trey Radel of Florida to take leave of absence after guilty plea to cocaine charge

Late on a Tuesday evening, at a Dupont Circle bistro that serves $11 mojitos, the congressman and the undercover officer talked about cocaine. They talked about how much the congressman would have to pay for it. They talked about the quality of the drug for sale. Finally, they made a deal: $250 for 3.5 grams, an amount generally bought for personal use. Outside, in a car, the drug and money changed hands. And then, suddenly, there were feds outside the vehicle. Before that moment, Rep. Trey Radel (R-Fla.) had built a remarkable double...

David A. Fahrenthold, Keith L. Alexander and Sari Horwitz | The Washington Post 21 Nov 2013 Hits:405 Florida

Read more

Rubio heckled over immigration reform at conservative summit in Florida

Rubio heckled over immigration reform at conservative summit in Florida

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) faced hecklers angry with his leadership on immigration reform at a Friday Tea Party summit in his home state.  According to reports, Rubio was met with cries of "No amnesty!" as he gave an address during the opening session of the Americans for Prosperity's Defending the American Dream Summit in Orlando. The Florida senator joined a handful of other potential 2016 Republican presidential contenders, including Texas Gov. Rick Perry and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, at the summit on Friday. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz will keynote Saturday's closing session. Rubio...

Alexandra Jaffe | The Hill 01 Sep 2013 Hits:710 Florida

Read more

'Bigger Than Stand Your Ground': Protesters Mark 13 Days of Florida Capitol Occupation

'Bigger Than Stand Your Ground': Protesters Mark 13 Days of Florida Capitol Occupation

(Photo: Phil Sears/ AP; Thumb: Dream Defenders/ Twitter) Civil rights icon Harry Belafonte joins mass rally against discrimination "I’m here because you called. I’m here because I am a part of your history," notable civil rights activist and musical icon Harry Belafonte declared Friday to a crowd of hundreds of demonstrators inside the main rotunda of the Florida capitol building. The rally, billed as #theTakeover, was one of a number of demonstrations staged by the Dream Defenders since the group took residence in the capitol on July 16 in an ongoing sit-in to...

Lauren McCauley | Common Dreams 31 Jul 2013 Hits:520 Florida

Read more

Florida Accidentally Banned All Computers, Smart Phones In The State Through Internet Cafe…

Florida Accidentally Banned All Computers, Smart Phones In The State Through Internet Cafe Ban: Lawsuit

When Florida lawmakers recently voted to ban all Internet cafes, they worded the bill so poorly that they effectively outlawed every computer in the state, according to a recent lawsuit. In April Florida Governor Rick Scott approved a ban on slot machines and Internet cafes after a charity tied to Lt. Governor Jennifer Carroll was shut down on suspicion of being an Internet gambling front -- forcing Carroll, who had consulted with the charity, to resign. Florida's 1,000 Internet cafes were shut down immediately, including Miami-Dade's Incredible Investments, LLC, a café that provides online services to migrant workers,...

Huffington Post 08 Jul 2013 Hits:832 Florida

Read more

Gov. Rick Scott Deflowers Florida

Gov. Rick Scott Deflowers Florida

Members of the Florida state Legislature rarely agree on anything. It's unusual for a bill to get unanimous support from the body. But as it turns out, there is one thing that both Republicans and Democrats really love: wildflowers. Florida lawmakers in both houses of the Legislature voted a collective 157 to 0 this spring to increase the fee for a special Florida wildflower license plate from $15 to $25 starting in July. The proceeds would have gone to the Florida Wildflower Foundation, which for 13 years has been using...

Stephanie Mencimer | Mother Jones 18 Jun 2013 Hits:782 Florida

Read more

Miami-Dade Police Choke Black Teenager Because He Was Giving Them "Dehumanizing Stares"

Miami-Dade Police Choke Black Teenager Because He Was Giving Them

Fourteen-year-old Tremaine McMillian didn't threaten police. He didn't attack them. He wasn't armed. All the black teenager did was appear threatening by shooting Miami-Dade police officers a few "dehumanizing stares," and that was apparently enough for the officers to decide to slam him against the ground and put him in a chokehold. During Memorial Day weekend, McMillian was rough-housing with another teenager on the sand. Police approached the teen on an ATV and told him that wasn't acceptable behavior. They asked him where his parents were, but MicMillian attempted to walk...

Kyle Munzenrieder | Miami NewTimes 30 May 2013 Hits:762 Florida

Read more

Charges dropped against Florida teen over amateur science experiment

Charges dropped against Florida teen over amateur science experiment

The Florida teenager who was arrested two weeks ago for causing a small explosion on the campus of her high school will not be charged with a crime. Kiera Wilmot, 16, was arrested by police in Bartow, Florida, after conducting an unauthorized science experiment which lightly damaged an eight ounce plastic water bottle. At the time, Wilmot faced possible charges for “possessing or discharging weapons or firearms at a school sponsored event or on school property.” If she had been convicted, she could have faced up to five years in prison. Wilmot’s...

Ned Resnikoff | MSNBC.com 16 May 2013 Hits:848 Florida

Read more

Florida Campaign for Medical Marijuana Gets Financial Backers

Florida Campaign for Medical Marijuana Gets Financial Backers

Two top Democratic fundraisers in Florida have committed to providing the money and know-how to get the question of legalizing medical marijuana on the state ballot in 2014. "I'm prepared to keep raising money and writing checks until I get the signatures to put it on the ballot," attorney John Morgan said late on Tuesday. Morgan, who routinely hosts presidents and national political figures at his Orlando-area home, recently signed on as chairman of People United for Medical Marijuana-Florida, a grassroots campaign that operated on a shoestring until now. Morgan was recruited by...

Barbara Liston | Reuter's 22 Apr 2013 Hits:739 Florida

Read more

Occupy Palm Beach County: One Year Later

Occupy Palm Beach County: One Year Later

On September 17, 2011 Occupy Wall Street coalesced into sudden view, built from long work by many organizers, the promptings of Adbusters magazine, and the accumulated frustration, anger and desperation of decades of escalating class warfare by financial and corporate elites against ordinary people. A small group of young people near Lake Worth, Florida recognized themselves in the actions of the mostly young people in New York, and began to plan their own Occupation. People on local union, Democratic Party, progressive and other e-mail lists were invited to a rally at...

Mike Budd | Palm Beach Progressive Post 22 Jan 2013 Hits:646 Florida

Read more

Florida Governor Inflates Cost Of Medicaid Expansion By 2,600% To Avoid Implementing Obama…

Florida Governor Inflates Cost Of Medicaid Expansion By 2,600% To Avoid Implementing Obamacare

Internal email messages uncovered by Health News Florida reveal that Gov. Rick Scott (R-FL) is knowingly citing inaccurate cost estimates to justify his refusal to expand Florida’s Medicaid program. Though the governor’s office is fully aware that the numbers are wrong, Scott continues to use them anyway, the documents show. Florida, which has one of the highest rates of uninsurance in the nation, could extend health coverage to about one million low-income residents by accepting Obamacare’s optional Medicaid expansion. But the governor — an ardent Obamacare opponent — has...

Tara Culp-Ressler | Think Progress 08 Jan 2013 Hits:976 Florida

Read more

Ex-Fla. Gov. Crist tweets he's switching to Democrat Party

Ex-Fla. Gov. Crist tweets he's switching to Democrat Party

Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, who was elected as the state's chief executive as a Republican and then ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate as an independent, announced on Twitter on Friday night that he's switching to the Democratic Party. The announcement fanned speculation that Crist was gearing up to seek to regain his old job from Republican Gov. Rick Scott in 2014. Crist sent out a Tweet that said, "Proud and honored to join the Democratic Party in the home of President (at)Barack Obama!" The Tweet included a...

Gary Fineout | Associated Press 08 Dec 2012 Hits:1011 Florida

Read more

Florida Early Voters Show Up in Huge Numbers Despite Suppression Effort

Florida Early Voters Show Up in Huge Numbers Despite Suppression Effort

As the St. John Progressive Missionary Baptist Church vans pulled up to the C. Blythe Andrews library polling place to let congregants out to vote, a line already snaked out the voting entrance. A table was set up on one end of the library’s parking lot where volunteers served fried fish and hush puppies. A DJ blared gospel music that could be heard blocks away. It was after-church Sunday, the first and only Sunday of “Souls to the Polls” in most of Florida, and the second...

Brentin Mock and Voting Rights Watch | the Nation 30 Oct 2012 Hits:894 Florida

Read more

Florida Democrats Crushing The GOP in 2012 Voter Registrations

Florida Democrats Crushing The GOP in 2012 Voter Registrations

On the last day to register for the 2012 election, new Democratic voters outnumber the GOP by six-to-one or more.  Don’t get depressed by the latest polls with Mitt Romney pulling ahead in Florida or by reports of the GOP’s plans to steal the election there by falsifying Democratic voter registration files. Tuesday is the final day to register to vote for the presidential election in Florida and Democrats have trounced the GOP’s efforts to register voters. Consider these numbers from the Florida Secretary of State’s...

Steven Rosenfeld | AlterNet 09 Oct 2012 Hits:1482 Florida

Read more

Romney Works to Build Momentum in Florida, a State Critical to Victory

Romney Works to Build Momentum in Florida, a State Critical to Victory

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — Seeking to capitalize on his commanding debate performance last week, Mitt Romney tried to turn the enthusiasm of large crowds during a three-day visit to Florida into momentum to carry a state that, by all accounts, is crucial to his path to the White House. His effort to capture a state that President Obama won in 2008 came on a day when the usual pattern of the race was reversed: while Mr. Romney has been criticized by some Republicans for spending too...

Trip Gabriel | The New York Times 08 Oct 2012 Hits:824 Florida

Read more

Has Florida Created a Trap at the Polls for Ex-Felons?

Has Florida Created a Trap at the Polls for Ex-Felons?

Tampa Despite the heat and threat of thunderstorms, about 500 African-Americans are gathered in Rowlett Park for an end-of-summer day of barbecuing, dancing and playing cards. It’s the fifth annual Old School Picnic, a community park jam that brings together two black neighborhoods that were torn apart when the College Hill and Ponce de Leon public housing projects were razed in 2000. Earlier that morning, President Barack Obama held a massive campaign rally in nearby St. Petersburg, trying to turn out every last...

Brentin Mock | The Nation 29 Sep 2012 Hits:1028 Florida

Read more

Suspicious voter registration forms found in 10 Florida counties

Suspicious voter registration forms found in 10 Florida counties

Florida elections officials said Friday that at least 10 counties have identified suspicious and possibly fraudulent voter registration forms turned in by a firm working for the Republican Party of Florida, which has filed an election fraud complaint with the state Division of Elections against its one-time consultant. The controversy in Florida -- which began with possibly fraudulent forms that first cropped up in Palm Beach County --  has engulfed the Republican National Committee, which admitted Thursday that it urged state parties in seven swing states...

By Matea Gold, Joseph Tanfani and Melanie Mason | LosAngeles Times Politics 29 Sep 2012 Hits:1174 Florida

Read more

After Mistakenly Purging Citizens, Florida Agrees to Let Them Vote

After Mistakenly Purging Citizens, Florida Agrees to Let Them Vote

In a partial victory for voter rights and immigrant groups, Florida residents who were mistakenly removed from the voter rolls this year because the state classified them as noncitizens will be returned to the rolls and allowed to vote in November. The Florida Department of State, which initiated the review of noncitizens on the voter rolls, also agreed Wednesday to inform the 2,625 people on the list who are eligible to vote that their voting rights had been fully restored. Still unresolved is whether Florida...

Lizette Alvarez | The New York Times 13 Sep 2012 Hits:984 Florida

Read more

Rick Scott Rejects Health Care Funds That Would Keep Disabled Kids Out of Nursing Homes

Rick Scott Rejects Health Care Funds That Would Keep Disabled Kids Out of Nursing Homes

Florida's Republican governor Rick Scott loathes Obamacare so much that he turned down $40 million in federal health care funds that would keep hundreds of disabled kids at home with their parents, rather than warehoused in nursing homes. So says the Department of Justice, whose civil rights division recently investigated the situation in Florida. ABC News reported this weekend that, in a letter to Florida's attorney general, the Justice Department cited the case of a "5-year-old child, a quadriplegic after a car accident, who had been...

Stephanie Mencimer | Mother Jones 11 Sep 2012 Hits:4178 Florida

Read more

The Faces of Voter Suppression Become the Voices of Voter Empowerment at “Let Me Vote”

The Faces of Voter Suppression Become the Voices of Voter Empowerment at “Let Me Vote”

On September 12, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Florida and partner organizations will host a coalition of individuals impacted by restrictive voting regulations in Florida sharing their stories about combating disenfranchisement and informing voters about their rights at “Let Me Vote: The Faces of Voter Suppression Become the Voices of Voter Empowerment.” The event marks the launch of the ACLU of Florida’s “Let Me Vote” campaign, part of a nationwide ACLU program of the same name aiming to get accessible,...

ACLU Florida 10 Sep 2012 Hits:822 Florida

Read more

Two Florida Republicans Want Law Allowing Gun Owners to Shoot 'Illegal' Voters

Two Florida Republicans Want Law Allowing Gun Owners to Shoot 'Illegal' Voters

They were classic buttoned-up conservatives, but I couldn’t believe my ears. “Are you guys performance artists?” "No," Stevens snorted. Just a few minutes earlier, two men who identified themselves as Robert Stevens and John Nelson had handed me a flyer. It explained that they wanted the state of Florida to pass a “Protect the Polls law” under which “anyone suspected of committing voter fraud can be fired upon – provided the weapon is registered and operated by its licensed owner.” The two 28-year-olds, who said...

Arun Gupta | AlterNet 30 Aug 2012 Hits:1184 Florida

Read more

PDA In Your State

PDA Network - Shows This Week

banner-climatechange1019

wr10-20

banner-agitatorradio

BannerPoliticsofFaithAll

Banner-EndingHomelessnessAll

Sign the Petition

Button-DetroitWater

 

PDA Issues

PDA is organized around several core issues. These issues include:

Each team hosts a monthly conference call. Calls feature legislators, staffers and other policy experts. On these calls we determine PDA legislation to support as well as actions and future events.

Florida Leadership


For support in organizing within your state, contact:



Mike Fox

 

State Leadership
Mike Fox

Email us at: field@pdamerica.org

Chapters

Broward County - CD 17, 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23
Daytona Beach - CD 07 and 24
Hillsborough County - CD 09 and 11
Martin County - CD 16 and 23
Miami - CD 17 and 20
Orange County
Palm Beach County - CD 16, 19 22 and 23
Pinellas County - CD 09, 10 and 11
Polk County - CD 12
Sarasota County - CD 17 and 20
Tallahassee

 Want to bring progressive change to Florida? Start a PDA chapter; send us an email and we'll get you started.


FL Legislators with ALEC Ties

House of Representatives

  • Rep. Larry Ahern (R-51), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Ben Albritton (R-66), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Dennis Baxley (R-Ocala), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting, sponsored 2005 SB 436 "Castle Doctrine Act" based on ALEC model[52]
  • Rep. Michael Bileca (R-117), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Jeff Brandes (R-52), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[52]
  • Rep. Jason Brodeur (R-33), ALEC Tax and Fiscal Policy Task Force member, registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Rachel Burgin (R-56), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Matt Caldwell (R-73), ALEC member who has "attended one conference to date, having paid for the membership and any conference costs with my excess campaign account"[53][51]
  • Rep. Richard Corcoran (R-45), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Fred Costello (R-26), "could not afford the time out of my business to attend" the 2011 ALEC Annual meeting but looks "forward to attending ALEC in the future"[54]
  • Rep. Steve Crisafulli (R-32), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51] but "not a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council"[55]
  • Rep. Daniel Davis (R-13), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Jose Diaz (R-115), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Chris Dorworth (R-34), dues-paying ALEC member as of 2011[56], registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Brad Drake (R -5)[17]
  • Rep. Clay Ford (R-3)[17][20], ALEC Energy, Environment and Agriculture Task Force member, registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Rich Glorioso (R-Longwood), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[52]
  • Rep. Matt Hudson (R-101), ALEC Health and Human Services Task Force member, registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Clay Ingram (R-2), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[57][51]
  • Rep. Ana Rivas Logan (R-114), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Debbie Mayfield (R-80), ALEC member[58]
  • Rep. Peter Nehr (R-48), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Bryan Nelson (R-38), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Jeanette Nunez (R-Miami), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[52]
  • Rep. Jimmy T. Patronis, Jr. (R-6), ALEC State Chairman[59], registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Ray Pilon (R-69); Public Safety and Elections Task Force
  • Rep. Scott Plakon (R-37), ALEC International Relations Task Force member, worked with ALEC in 2011 on "a proposed constitutional amendment that prohibits laws that would force people to join health care plans, an attack on federal health care changes"[52]
  • Rep. Stephen L. Precourt (R-41), ALEC Tax and Fiscal Policy Task Force member, registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Lake Ray (R-17), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Kelli Stargel (R-64), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. John Tobia (R-31), attended 2009 ALEC Annual Meeting at a taxpayer cost of $1,150; [60] in August 2011 claimed he has not attended another ALEC meeting and is not a member[61]
  • Rep. Carlos Trujillo (R-116), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. Will Weatherford (R-61), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[51]
  • Rep. John Wood (R-65), ALEC Health and Human Services Task Force member who calls himself "proud to be a member of ALEC and has attended two annual conferences - Atlanta in 2009 and most recently New Orleans in 2011"[62][51]
  • Rep. Dana Young (R-Tampa), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[52]
  • Former Rep. Bill Posey (now Congressman, R-Rockledge), ALEC Alumni in Congress[63] and 1999 recipient of ALEC "Legislator of the Year" Award[64]

Senate

Information from Sourcewatch:

PR Rank